Discrimination in the payment of full-time wage premiums

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Discrimination in the payment of full-time wage premiums

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dc.contributor.author Averett, Susan
dc.contributor.author Hotchkiss, J. L.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-31T19:37:14Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-31T19:37:14Z
dc.date.issued 1996-01
dc.identifier.citation Averett, S. and J. L. Hotchkiss. (1996) "Discrimination in the payment of full-time wage premiums." Industrial and Labor Relations Review 49 (2): 287-301. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10385/988
dc.description.abstract This study investigates how many hours must be worked per week in order for workers in different race and gender groups to receive a high-hours (full-time) wage premium. An analysis of 1989 Current Population Survey data shows that across occupations, both white and black men received a full-time wage premium for working at least 33 hours per week, whereas white women had to work at least 37 hours and black women at least 39 hours to receive the premium. Controlling for occupation changes the threshold for black women to 33 hours, but does not change the results for the other groups. The authors find that the observed differences account for, at most, two percentage points of the wage differentials across race and gender. en_US
dc.publisher Indusrial and Labor Relations Review en_US
dc.title Discrimination in the payment of full-time wage premiums en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.2307/2524944

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