Separating membrane and surface tension contributions in Pickering droplet deformation

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Separating membrane and surface tension contributions in Pickering droplet deformation

Show simple item record


dc.contributor.author Ferri, James K.
dc.contributor.author Carl, P.
dc.contributor.author Gorevski, N.
dc.contributor.author Russell, T. P.
dc.contributor.author Wang, Q.
dc.contributor.author Boker, A.
dc.contributor.author Fery, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-30T19:50:47Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-30T19:50:47Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Ferri, J. K., et al. (2008). "Separating membrane and surface tension contributions in Pickering droplet deformation." Soft Matter 4 (11): 2259-2266 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10385/764
dc.description.abstract We studied the deformation properties of single Pickering-emulsion droplets using a combination of Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) in force spectroscopy mode and Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM). The droplets were made from an oil-in-water emulsion system which was stabilized by cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles; the interfacial particle layers were either native or crosslinked after interfacial assembly. A general problem in the interpretation of deformation measurements of such complex microcapsules is the fact that both surface tension and mechanical membrane tensions may contribute to the force response of the droplet against deformation. While of different nature, the two contributions are difficult to separate and their relative importance in Pickering droplet deformation is unknown. In our approach, the droplet shape can be reconstructed during deformation using the RICM data. This enables calculation of stress-strain relationships of the droplet surface and a comparison with a continuum mechanical shell theory. In these relations interfacial tensions are evidenced as an offset of membrane tension at zero deformation, while mechanical membrane-tensions increase for further deformation as expected by membrane theory. We find that for this particular system, interfacial tensions dominate the response to deformation. en_US
dc.publisher Soft Matter en_US
dc.title Separating membrane and surface tension contributions in Pickering droplet deformation en_US
dc.type Article en_US

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Ferri-SoftMatter-vol4-2008.pdf 1.535Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search LDR


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account